Photo: NSW Teachers Federation

Posted by & filed under City News.

By Emily Contador-Kelsall

Schools in the state seat of Sydney are set to lose $13.5 million in federal funding following the Abbott government’s budget cuts.

Schools in the Graydler electorate will lose a further $23.1 million.

These cuts will disproportionately affect children in public schools with extra learning needs, Indigenous children, children with language proficiency problems and children from less wealthy families, according to Michelle Rosicky, the Inner City organiser for NSW Teachers Federation.

The loss will also impact children in the later years of primary school, with significant funding being cut for children in years 5 and 6.

In response, inner city schools are backing a national campaign to stop the Abbott government’s cuts to Gonski funding.

The Inner City Teacher’s Association showed their support for the Gonski funding scheme during National Gonski Week, a week of action against federal education cuts.

Ms Rosicky said local teachers had kept communities informed by remaining involved in the Gonski campaign.

“The Public Education community will not be going away; we are committed to a fairer school funding system so that all children have the opportunity no matter their family circumstances to achieve their best.”

Ms Rosicky said that across NSW the difference between the full 6 years of Gonski and the four years offered by Tony Abbott and Christoper Pyne is $3 billion, where two-thirds of the implementation funding is located in the final 2 years.

The Gonski review recommended in 2011 that schools should be funded according to student need and according to what was required to educate students to a high standard.

The former Labor Government produced a national, needs-based funding scheme for schools based on the Gonski Review’s recommendations, which was enacted in legislation passed last year.

The Abbott Government confirmed in the May Budget that it would cut the last two years of Gonski funding.

Inner City Teachers Association President Adam Willis said it is only after six years of funding that all schools should be at a point where they have the resources required to overcome current disadvantage and ensure needs are met into the future.

“Mr Abbott and the government he leads must restore the cuts made by abandoning the final two years of funding.”

Ms Rosicky said all public education teachers were asked to become involved in National Gonski Week and supported it.

The NSW Teachers Federation said the primary purpose of Gonski week was to inform parents, caregivers and community members of the critical importance of school funding reform and the real difference it will make in schools.

NSW Teachers Federation Secretary John Gauci said it is essential that local communities tell the Abbott government that Gonski funding is already making a big difference.

Schools in the state seat of Sydney are set to lose $13.5 million in federal funding following the Abbott government’s budget cuts.
Schools in the Graydler electorate will lose a further $23.1 million.
These cuts will disproportionately affect children in public schools with extra learning needs, Indigenous children, children with language proficiency problems and children from less wealthy families, according to Michelle Rosicky, the Inner City organiser for NSW Teachers Federation.
The loss will also impact children in the later years of primary school, with significant funding being cut for children in years 5 and 6.
In response, inner city schools are backing a national campaign to stop the Abbott government’s cuts to Gonski funding.
The Inner City Teacher’s Association showed their support for the Gonski funding scheme during National Gonski Week, a week of action against federal education cuts.
Ms Rosicky said local teachers had kept communities informed by remaining involved in the Gonski campaign.
“The Public Education community will not be going away; we are committed to a fairer school funding system so that all children have the opportunity no matter their family circumstances to achieve their best.”
Ms Rosicky said that across NSW the difference between the full 6 years of Gonski and the four years offered by Tony Abbott and Christoper Pyne is $3 billion, where two-thirds of the implementation funding is located in the final 2 years.
The Gonski review recommended in 2011 that schools should be funded according to student need and according to what was required to educate students to a high standard.
The former Labor Government produced a national, needs-based funding scheme for schools based on the Gonski Review’s recommendations, which was enacted in legislation passed last year.
The Abbott Government confirmed in the May Budget that it would cut the last two years of Gonski funding.
Inner City Teachers Association President Adam Willis said it is only after six years of funding that all schools should be at a point where they have the resources required to overcome current disadvantage and ensure needs are met into the future.
“Mr Abbott and the government he leads must restore the cuts made by abandoning the final two years of funding.”
Ms Rosicky said all public education teachers were asked to become involved in National Gonski Week and supported it.
The NSW Teachers Federation said the primary purpose of Gonski week was to inform parents, caregivers and community members of the critical importance of school funding reform and the real difference it will make in schools.
NSW Teachers Federation Secretary John Gauci said it is essential that local communities tell the Abbott government that Gonski funding is already making a big difference.