Posted by & filed under Arts & Entertainment, Movies.

Now in its fifth year, The Irish Film Festival is going from strength to strength, with an expanded program of 10 features, a short film competition and a program of LGBTQI shorts from Ireland.

The Irish know how to celebrate, so the opening night party will be held before and after the film, Float Like A Butterfly, with respected Sydney band The Last Aurochs playing Celtic and Irish music. Food and beverage will also be served.

Festival director, Dr Enda Murray said that Irish cinema had seven Irish connections in the Oscars last year. “The program this year is really strong right across the board. Irish cinema is doing quite well internationally and that has raised the bar for locally produced films.”

Short film competitions are quite popular in film festivals and this year’s submissions won’t disappoint. “We put a call out to filmmakers with Irish background around the world to submit short films, the aim being to encourage creativity within the Irish community and to support people who want to express their Irish identity.”

“It’s often quoted that one-third of Australians have Irish connections and so they should connect with the humour and the tone of the Irish films, which is black and sardonic,” explained Murray. “These are small films, incorporating minimal computer-generated graphics and simple plots with stories surrounding Irish people and I believe Aussie audiences will get that.” (MMo)

May 1-5. Chauvel Cinema, 249 Oxford St, Paddington. Opening Night film/party: $28-$35 Tickets & Info: www.irishfilmfestival.com.au

 

DR ENDA’S HOT PICKS:

FLOAT LIKE A BUTTERFLY:  The opening night Toronto award-winning film is set in 1972 and is about a young Irish female traveller who dreams of becoming a boxer. But she must overcome her family’s and society’s conventions to succeed.

DUBLIN OLDSCHOOL: Delves into the weekend of a wannabe DJ. A combination of film, theatre, and pop culture. A Rock ‘n’ Roll style of film for music enthusiasts.

BETWEEN LAND AND SEA: The rise of surf culture beneath the majestic Cliffs of Moher on the west coast of Ireland is explored in this exhilarating documentary. Captivating photography. A must for surf junkies.